By Jayashree Nandi

The Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago Trust in India (EPIC India) and the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) signed a Strategic Partnership agreement with the Gujarat government to set up India’s First Carbon Trading Market on Monday. The market will allow industries and power plants in Gujarat to trade CO2 permits and an overall cap will provide the government a flexible tool to meet climate goals. The market will be the first of its kind among today’s emerging economies, outside of China, said Michael Greenstone, Director of the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago (EPIC) and Milton Friedman Distinguished Service Professor. Greenstone believes a cap and trade carbon market can significantly reduce CO2 emissions and facilitate faster economic growth, than is possible from other approaches. Excerpts from an interview:

Q. How will the cap and trade scheme work in Gujarat? Can companies from outside interested in trading also participate?

A. The Government today announced that it will launch a CO2 cap-and-trade market. It builds on Gujarat’s success in launching India’s first emissions market, which was for particulate air pollution, that the CM recently announced will be scaled up throughout Gujarat. The success of the Gujarat experience at providing a win-win in that it reduces pollution while minimizing the costs on industry mirrors the experiences of the US, EU, and recently China with pollution markets. For now, the proposal is to identify large emitters (i.e large energy users) in the power and manufacturing sector in Gujarat and setting a maximum level of CO2 emissions (i.e., a cap). Gujarat would then be issuing permits equal to this target and allow firms to trade. This allows industries that can reduce their emissions inexpensively to receive payments from those that find it more costly to do so. The initial proposal is that this market be restricted to existing participants and new entrants in these sectors, although there is flexibility to allow others to participate over time. Importantly, the cap is likely to both facilitate increases in electricity consumption and, at the same time, be consistent with India’s Paris commitment to reduce the economy’s carbon intensity.

Q. What are your hopes from this cap-and-trade scheme? How will it help reduce emissions in Gujarat?

A. Dating back to Modi’s time as CM, Gujarat has been a leader in adopting innovations for environmental regulations, often setting the standard for what is to follow in India and the subsequent South Asian region. A notable example is the reform of their environmental audit program after rigorous evaluation that began more than a decade ago. More recently, my colleagues and I found that their ETS pilot for particulate in Surat reduced emissions by 24% with little cost for industry. Based on experiences from Surat and other places around the world, my expectation is that this cap-and-trade market for carbon will significantly reduce CO2 emissions and facilitate faster economic growth, than is possible from other approaches to meeting India’s COP26 commitments. It is designed to be in conjunction with the most significant industrial players in one of the foremost industrial states of the country and in this respect can serve as a model for the rest of India and other parts of the world. Of course, it is critical that these efforts be rigorously evaluated and indeed this is Gujarat’s plan– my colleagues and I are deeply humbled by the opportunity to help with these efforts.

Q. Why was Gujarat selected for this pilot scheme?

A. I think the better question is why did Gujarat choose to do the pilot? The short answer is that this is straight out of the Gujarat Government’s playbook of innovation on environmental regulation and other areas. Gujarat has a history of being a leader in environmental policy in the country. They set-up the first dedicated Climate Change Dept. in the country in 2009. The University of Chicago and J-PAL South Asia have a long-standing relationship with several related departments in the Gujarat Government and several examples of working together for more than a decade. Before this, we partnered and researched how to make Gujarat’s environmental audit procedure more transparent and efficient. The Government took the results and reformed policy. For the past several years, we have been successfully providing advice to the Gujarat Pollution Control Board on the world’s first Emissions Trading Market for Particulate matter with 300 industries in Surat, which has been enormously successful. To borrow from my home country, many of the most important US environmental policies were first piloted in the state of California and then taken up nationally. Gujarat is fast becoming the California of Indian environmental policy by serving as the laboratory for the most important policy ideas. But even more broadly, Gujarat is an absolute global leader in its commitment to testing environmental policy reforms in the most rigorous ways possible before scaling them up.

Continue Reading at Hindustan Times…

Areas of Focus: Climate Change
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Climate Change
Climate change is an urgent global challenge. EPIC research is helping to assess its impacts, quantify its costs, and identify an efficient set of policies to reduce emissions and adapt...
Environment
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Environment
Producing and using energy damages people’s health and the environment. EPIC research is quantifying the social costs of energy choices and uncovering policies that help protect health while facilitating growth.
Air Pollution
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Air Pollution
Air pollution from fossil fuel combustion poses a grave threat to human health worldwide. EPIC research is using real-world data to calculate the effects of air pollution on human health...
EPIC-India
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EPIC-India
As the world’s fastest-growing carbon emitter and second most-polluted country, India is central to the global energy challenge. EPIC’s robust team in India works hand-in-hand with government leaders to implement...