By Amanda Hoover

More Americans now acknowledge the existence of climate change and the need to combat it, but far fewer see the task as something for which they should be held financially responsible, according to a new poll.

The poll, conducted by the Energy Police Institute at the University of Chicago and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that 65 percent of people think climate change is an issue the government needs to address, but many are unwilling to pay any money to stop it. But the findings did uncover a change in Americans’ views on the validity of climate change: 77 percent said climate change was happening, while 13 percent were unsure. Only ten percent denied its existence.

“These findings confirm that there is a shift underway in how concerned all Americans are about climate change,” Michael Greenstone, the director of the Energy Policy Institute, said in a statement. “It is becoming clear that people are seeing more and more that it is worthwhile to invest some money today to help reduce the odds of the worst climate damages…”

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