By Ron Brackett

More than 13% of Americans believe humans are not responsible for climate change, a new poll has found, putting the country ahead of all western nations when it comes to climate deniers.

In fact, in the poll of 23 countries world wide, only two others had a higher percentage of people who say “human activity is not responsible at all” for climate change, according to The Guardian.

In Indonesia, 18% of those surveyed said climate change is not manmade. In Saudi Arabia, it was 16%, according to the survey conducted by the YouGov-Cambridge Globalism Project in partnership with The Guardian.

The project surveyed 25,325 people in February and March in 23 countries across Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia.

The United States was also ahead of other western countries in the number of people — 13% — who said they did not know whether the climate was changing or people were responsible. Five percent said the climate is not changing.

A poll conducted this past November by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC) and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that seven in 10 Americans now believe climate change is a reality. (Only 9% of those surveyed in that poll said climate change is not happening.)

The EPIC poll found that 86 percent of Democrats and 52 percent of Republicans believe climate change is real.

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Areas of Focus: Climate Change
Definition
Climate Change
Climate change is an urgent global challenge. EPIC research is helping to assess its impacts, quantify its costs, and identify an efficient set of policies to reduce emissions and adapt...
Climate Science
Definition
Climate Science
EPIC’s interdisciplinary team of researchers is contributing to a cross-cutting body of knowledge on the scientific causes of climate change and its social consequences.
Public Opinion on Energy & Climate Change
Definition
Public Opinion on Energy & Climate Change
How important is fighting climate change to the American public? An annual poll released with The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research gives insight.