Climate change is already affecting everyday lives. Record-breaking temperatures, melting ice on land and sea, more frequent coastal flooding, prolonged droughts, and damaging storms are just some of the intensifying risks that people will face as the planet continues to warm. The best available scientific evidence suggests that climatic changes observed over the past few decades are likely to accelerate, with implications for the health and welfare of every community around the world and the performance of every sector of the economy.

To confront these challenges, business leaders, policymakers, investors, and other stakeholders need information about the nature of the risks they face. They need to know the impact climate change is already having on supply chains, investments, and their local communities, and how things are likely to change going forward. The need to know how those risks can be mitigated by greenhouse gas emissions reductions, investments in resilient infrastructure and public health systems, and other forms of adaptation. And, they need to know how much will it cost. These questions have remained largely unanswered at the level of detail and with the level of rigor required for effective decision-making.

The Research

To advance understanding of the social and economic costs of climate change, EPIC Director Michael Greenstone co-founded the Climate Impact Lab, a first-of-its-kind multidisciplinary effort that includes a team of approximately 25 economists, climate scientists, and computational experts. The team is focused on producing two primary outputs: 1) the world’s first empirically-derived estimate of the global social cost of carbon, the cost to society from each ton of carbon dioxide emitted; and 2) estimates of the physical (e.g., temperature, precipitation, inundation, and flooding/storm surges) and economic impacts of climate change at a highly localized level (e.g., counties in the United States) for the world.

Using the most comprehensive climate and economic data sets ever compiled, the Lab is estimating the relationship between a changing climate and human well-being across eight principal categories: mortality, agriculture, energy demand, labor productivity, conflict, crime, migration, and coastal damages due to sea level rise and altered storms.

 “[One of the] biggest hubs of real-time climate research.”

– Emily Holden, Environment Reporter, Guardian US

The Impact

The Climate Impact Lab is rapidly making its mark on the research community, having already provided the first-ever estimates of the effect of climate change on total energy consumption globally; the most detailed and comprehensive empirical analysis of the susceptibility of crops to high temperatures; the first-ever methodology for evaluating the property-level impact of storm surge and wind damage; the largest dataset ever assembled on migration; the first estimates to capture the loss of productivity of the workforce due to climate change; and, one of the first fully empirically derived measures of willingness-to-pay to avoid climate change impacts on mortality.

As the Lab blazes new trails in climate research, it is equally committed to educating policymakers, business leaders, and the public about their exposure to climate risks and helping to inform adaptation efforts. This effort includes producing the tools needed to guide decisions. The Lab is developing a web-based platform to provide rigorous information about the local effects of climate change to guide climate adaptation planning and other decisions. For example, users all over the world will be able to see the costs of infrastructure damage due to storms and sea-level rise along their coastline, the link between temperatures and public health in the urban area where they live, and the need for new crop rotations or crop switching as temperature and rainfall conditions change in their area.

“This is like the adults entering the room. Economists have, for a quarter century, insisted that more work needs to be done to estimate climate damages. This team has done so.”

– Gernot Wagner, Harvard Economist, The Atlantic

To date, the U.S. Government Accountability Office has used much of the Lab’s research in a report urging the federal government to take climate change risks seriously. Nike teamed up with Lab researchers to study the connection between climate change and athletic performance and participation across a range of sports, from football and running to tennis. And, as “climate risk” enters the mainstream investment lexicon, the Lab is also helping to provide financial regulators with a holistic, evidence-based snapshot of how climate change will impact the economy and their investment decisions. Lab leaders have worked with the International Monetary Fund on climate economics and with central bankers in the Federal Reserve System. Climate Impact Lab research has also informed features in the New York TimesWashington Post, and the Wall Street Journal, bringing cutting-edge climate research to the phone screens and breakfast tables of millions of readers around the world.

Members of the Lab team have been involved in a number of additional efforts to advance knowledge and decision-making within specific realms of the research:

These include:

Social Cost of Carbon: The Lab is working in direct partnership with key states and central governments to improve the estimates and use of the social cost of carbon in policymaking. This work has included hosting top officials from Canada, Norway, and state governments throughout the United States for a full day of training and capacity building on ways to use the social cost of carbon in energy policy. Further, Lab members are advising a group of lawyers from the University of Chicago Law School in their efforts to advocate for the social cost of carbon as “best available science” in a number of current legal cases.

Energy: The Climate Impact Lab has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy and several electric utilities to assess the potential impact of climate change on U.S. energy systems. This work included providing highly granular temperature and demand data to several electric utilities to use in their long-term infrastructure and procurement planning processes.

Coastal Damage: With a growing body of evidence connecting climate change to increased hurricane intensity, the Lab’s team is helping to drive a new conversation around how to enact more efficient and forward-looking recovery plans in the wake of disaster. Members of the Lab have testified before Congress, stressing the need to help communities prepare for the future and underscoring the importance of integrating scientific inquiry with risk management.

On this topic, the Lab has worked on several specific efforts. In the wake of Hurricane Maria, the team quantified the potential damage of the storm on the Puerto Rican economy, and highlighted the importance of a large, timely, sustained and well-designed disaster relief aid package in mitigating that impact. The Lab’s Amir Jina traveled to the island to testify before Puerto Rico’s Fiscal Control Board ahead of a revision of the government’s fiscal plans.

The Lab’s work quantifying past, present, and future flood risk from hurricane-driven rainfall and storm surge helped shape a first-of-its-kind climate risk assessment mandated by the Bank of England in the stress tests it requires of all insurance companies it backs. Researchers provided this analysis for an initiative led by First Street Foundation, which publicly discloses the cumulative flood risk of nearly every home in the U.S. over a 30-year mortgage, equipping homeowners and potential buyers with information about the risks they may face. Further, the states of California, Washington, Oregon, Maryland and Delaware, and the cities of Boston and New York, are relying on the Lab’s sea level rise data to prepare and update their coastal plans.

Conflict: Amid the growing global crisis of migration and displacement, Lab members are helping humanitarian organizations, crisis prevention groups, and national security agencies parse climate change’s role in driving conflict. This work has included the development of a real-time seasonal forecasting tool to predict changes in the risk of conflict induced by seasonal climate conditions, transforming the data and statistical models in this field into a user-friendly product that can help guide crime- and conflict-prevention efforts.

Lab members worked directly with the International Rescue Committee (IRC) on a pilot project to mobilize these maps into policy-relevant updatable tools to enhance the IRC’s standard risk assessment process. By request, they have also provided briefings to the Department of Defense regarding the development and possible uses of this forecasting tool.

Visit the Climate Impact Lab

Areas of Focus: Climate Change
Definition
Climate Change
Climate change is an urgent global challenge. EPIC research is helping to assess its impacts, quantify its costs, and identify an efficient set of policies to reduce emissions and adapt...
Climate Economics
Definition
Climate Economics
Climate change will affect every sector of the economy, both locally and globally. EPIC research is quantifying these effects to help guide policymakers, businesses, and individuals working to mitigate and...
Climate Law & Policy
Definition
Climate Law & Policy
As countries around the world implement policies to confront climate change, EPIC research is calculating which policies will have the most impact for the least cost.
Climate Science
Definition
Climate Science
EPIC’s interdisciplinary team of researchers is contributing to a cross-cutting body of knowledge on the scientific causes of climate change and its social consequences.
Climate Impact Lab
Definition
Climate Impact Lab
Climate change is already altering lives every day. The Climate Impact Lab is building the world’s most comprehensive body of research quantifying the impacts of climate change sector-by-sector, community-by-community, around...
Social Cost of Carbon
Definition
Social Cost of Carbon
The social cost of carbon is an essential tool for incorporating the cost of climate change into policy-making, corporate planning and investment decisionmaking in the United States and around the...