Energy Markets

Energy Markets

Supplying energy to homes and businesses requires a complex regulatory and commodity structure. In the face of challenges like population growth, increased urbanization and climate change, how energy is produced, dispersed, and used is changing rapidly. What will electricity generation and supply look like a decade from now? What are the most efficient regulations to cut emissions? And how can a price on carbon be realized?

EPIC in the News

Nov 17 2014
ClimateWire: How to Make the Clean Power Plan Affordable

ClimateWire's Nathanael Massey writes about Michael Greenstone's latest analysis in Science.

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Nov 14 2014
EPIC’s Inaugural Student Social

EPIC held its inaugural student social on Thursday, November 13 at American Junkie in River North, Chicago. Graduate students and faculty from different schools and disciplines came out to meet others who are interested in energy. 

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Nov 13 2014
EPA’s Clean Power Plan: Economic Strengths and Weaknesses

Thirteen top economists analyze the Obama Administration’s main climate policy in Science.

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EPA’s Clean Power Plan: Economic Strengths and Weaknesses

EPA’s Clean Power Plan: Economic Strengths and Weaknesses photo

Thirteen top economists analyze the Obama Administration’s main climate policy in Science.

An analysis of the Obama Administration’s plan for reducing carbon emissions from power plants suggests that while the plan provides flexibility, allowing emissions to be reduced in cost-effective ways, additional reforms could permit further emissions reduction for the least cost.

The Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan, released in June 2014 and seeking public comments until December 1, aims to reduce carbon emissions from existing power plants by 30 percent (below 2005 levels) by 2030. Under the rule, states are required to develop plans to meet specific standards devised by the EPA. In the latest edition of Science, economists from the University of Chicago, Stanford, Yale, Harvard, MIT and the University of California-Berkeley and Davis have come together to give their take on the plan. Specifically, they assess whether the plan will achieve its intended emissions reductions, and how it can do so in the most cost-effective manner.

“The Clean Power Plan demonstrates that the United States is serious about confronting climate change. It will provide the U.S. with critical leverage in the international climate negotiations next year in Paris,” says Michael Greenstone, one of the authors of the Science analysis and the director of the University of Chicago’s Energy Policy Institute at Chicago (EPIC).

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Publications Database

EPIC features publications from a researches on a variety of energy-related topics.

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